Printed from www.dianemorgancooks.com

From Sweet to Savory: The Delicious Underground World of Root Vegetables

In this demonstration class let’s do the unexpected and fall in love with root vegetables for so many reasons!
They are nutrition powerhouses; they are inexpensive and store well—perfect for family budgeting and timesaving shopping; and they can be dressed up and spectacular wintertime entertaining.
From juicing carrots for a “nutritious” cocktail to using the tops of radishes to make an emerald-green pureed soup, this class explores the sweet and savory side of root vegetables. We’ll see parsnips turned into a savory puree and then grated for a sweet three-layer cake.

Menu:
Carrot Margarita
Radish Top Soup
Seared Duck Breast over Parsnip Purée with Port Reduction
Celery Root, Celery Heart, and Celery Leaf Salad
Three-Layer Parsnip Cake with Cream Cheese Frosting

Date: Saturday, February 15th
Time: 10:00 to 2:00 pm
Location: The Good Keuken Kitchen at 5031 NE 42nd Ave., red door towards the back of the parking lot.
Cost: $75 per person, includes instruction, recipes & lunch. Books available for signing and purchase.
RSVP TODAY → space is limited

James Beard Award-Winning Cookbook Author Diane Morgan to Teach Winter 2014 Workshops on Recipe Writing and Food & Book Proposal Writing

This winter I am sharing my expertise and offering two food and recipe writing workshops.

FOOD WRITING THAT SELLS
This course is designed for chefs, aspiring culinary students, journalists, authors, and food aficionados who want to learn how to translate their passion for food and writing into marketable works. Skills taught include developing story and book ideas, writing book and story proposals, pitching editors, finding an agent, navigating a contract, blogging and writing for the web, working with a ghostwriter and connecting to professional organizations.

Saturday, January 25, 2014
9 a.m. to 2p.m.
at Good Keuken, 5031 NE 42nd Ave., Portland, OR 97218.
Cost: $125 (includes morning coffee and lunch).
Learn more and register here …

RECIPE WRITING INTENSIVE WORKSHOP
This enlightening course will demystify the art and technical side of recipe writing. Topics include basic rules of recipe writing, formatting techniques, concisely defining an ingredient list, tailoring a recipe to a publication’s specifications and designing recipes that include sub-recipes and multiple steps. The class will cover creative headnotes and recipe titles.

This course is for writers, chefs, culinary students and hobbyists wanting to strengthen their recipe writing skills. 

Saturday, February 1, 2014
9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
at Good Keuken (behind Old Salt Marketplace), 5031 N.E. 42nd Ave. Portland, OR 97218.
Cost: $125 includes morning coffee and lunch).
Learn more and register here …

 

An Impressive Confection Made in Twenty Minutes

In her delightful cookbook, The Sugar Cube, Kir Jensen describes her Black-and-White Sesame Brittle as a DIY last-minute gift. She’s right!

From start to finish, I made this addictive brittle in 20 minutes. In a heavy-bottomed saucepan I combined butter, sugar, water, and sea salt. I stirred the mixture to dissolve the sugar and let it boil until it reached 260°F on a candy thermometer. (OK, if truth be told, while I have a candy thermometer, I also have a very cool laser thermometer that is perfect for candy making and tempering chocolate.) At that point I added both white and black sesame seeds and continued to cook the sugar mixture until it was a dark golden brown or 350°F. Quickly, I poured it onto a parchment-lined baking sheet, spread it to a thin layer and let it harden. Voilà, brittle was made.

Continue here for the recipe for Black-and-White Sesame Brittle.

A Family Member Weighs In

stove-top cast iron griddle/grill

A couple of days after getting my new website up and running, I received a long e-mail from my brother Richard complimenting me on my work, and offering up a suggestion. He spent time on my site, perusing the recipes, looking at the books on my shelf, and thumbing through my Favorite Kitchen Tools.

He said, “Diane, remember you suggested that I buy a cast-iron stove-top griddle for baking my English muffins? Well, you didn’t put it on your site and I think you should. It’s a great tool.”

Richard loves to bake bread, make pizza, and, in general, work with dough. Making homemade English muffins is his new passion. I can attest to their goodness as I had one for breakfast on my last visit.

While it works to use a large, cast-iron skillet when making small batches of English muffins, for larger-scale production it really helps to have a bigger surface.  This cast-iron griddle conveniently fits over two burners, allowing the baker to cook twice as many muffins. But this pan does so much more than just English muffins.

I own this incredibly useful piece of equipment and use it regularly. My reversible grill/griddle is at least fifteen years old. The griddle side is perfect for pancakes or French toast, as well as for English muffins. Flip the griddle over and you have a two-burner indoor grill pan. It’s better than a single-burner grill pan because it can hold more food. I use it when it’s raining outside and I don’t feel like standing under an umbrella to grill. Continue reading

Welcome to My New Website!

Hello friends, it’s great to have you here. I am happy to announce my new website. Look around, find recipes, click on Portland Foodie Finds to see where I like to eat and shop in Portland. Check out the details of my kitchen and the reasoning behind my design. I receive queries all the time asking about sources, etc. It’s all here. Kitchen Tools lets you know what cookware, tools, and small appliances I chose for my kitchen–it’s the stuff I like best. And Wedding Registry Tips guides brides and grooms to selecting quality kitchen basics that will last a lifetime.

As fall approaches and my book tour begins, I’ll keep you up to date with my future classes and appearances. I can barely wait for my latest cookbook, Roots: The Definitive Compendium with more than 225 Recipes, to be published. Look for Roots early this fall.

Tools of the Trade

I’ve been cooking in some professional manner or another for just over thirty years. My first cookbook was published twenty-three years ago. I’m not writing this blog to ruminate on my well-seasoned status in the culinary field, I’m noting these years almost as a reminder to myself that some of my kitchen tools date to the very beginning of my cooking days.

Take for instance my mixer. I still have a spankin’ white KitchenAid mixer that my husband bought me as a birthday present in 1980.  I confess to replacing my ancient avocado green (now that dates me, or at least the era of my bridal registry) with a whirling dervish of a blender called a Vita-Mix, and my old food processor gave up the ghost and was replaced with a new one not many years ago. But it’s the little tools I forget about. Continue reading

My Kitchen Garden

I’d love to tell you I have a magical green thumb, that I’m a plant wizard that who can grow anything, anywhere. My husband would laugh, and rightfully so. It is a miracle when indoor plants survive my forgetful nature. If the information card on a houseplant I’m thinking of buying states, “This plant loves neglect,” then that’s the plant I buy. However, I have managed, with the help of my garden-savvy friend, Christine Bellushi, to plant a kitchen garden and two large container gardens of herbs. I step out my back door and right there on my deck is lettuce. Snip, snip and I have a salad.  Much as I love our farmers’ markets, this is even better.

Continue reading